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IJSTR >> Volume 5 - Issue 7, July 2016 Edition



International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research  
International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

Website: http://www.ijstr.org

ISSN 2277-8616



Proximate Composition, Energy Content And Sensory Properties Of Complementary Foods Produced From Blends Of Sorghum And African Yam Bean Flour

[Full Text]

 

AUTHOR(S)

Okoye, Joseph Ikechukwu, Ojobor, Charles Chijioke

 

KEYWORDS

Complementary foods, supplementation, proximate composition, energy value, sensory quality, sorghum-African yam bean composite flours.

 

ABSTRACT

the proximate composition, energy content and sensory properties of complementary foods prepared from sorghum and African yam bean flour blends were investigated. The sorghum flour (SF) was blended with African yam bean flour (AYBF) in the ratios of 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 and used for the production of complementary foods. The complementary foods produced were evaluated for proximate composition, energy content and sensory qualities using standard methods. The proximate composition of the samples showed that the protein content of the complementary foods increased gradually with increased level of African yam bean flour addition from 8.64% in 90:10 (SF: AYBF) to 13.44% in 50:50 (SF: AYBF) samples, while carbohydrate decreased. In the same vein, the energy content of the samples also increased with increased supplementation with African yam bean flour from 368.84KJ/100g in 90:10 (SF: AYBF) to 382.98KJ/100g in 50:50 (SF: AYBF). The sensory evaluation carried out on different samples of complementary food after reconstitution into gruels with boiling water showed that the formulation prepared from 100% sorghum flour used as control was most acceptable by the judges and also differed significantly (p≤0.05) from the other samples in flavour, texture and taste. However, the sample fortified with 50% African yam bean flour was scored highest in colour.

 

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