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IJSTR >> Volume 1 - Issue 4, May 2012 Edition



International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research  
International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research

Website: http://www.ijstr.org

ISSN 2277-8616



SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS AND THEIR AWARENESS ON LANDSLIDE HAZARD IN PENANG ISLAND, MALAYSIA

[Full Text]

 

AUTHOR(S)

Habibah Lateh, Vijaya Govindasamy

 

KEYWORDS

awareness, knowledge, landslide, students, Penang Island.

 

ABSTRACT

Landslide is a growing global threat and has been destroying lives and property of humankind. In most cases, the damages inflicted could be mitigated if there is a proper knowledge and awareness among the students. Students are playing an important role in maintaining a safe environment and harmony as well as the hope of the nation. Moreover, they themselves become victims to the threat of landslides triggered by man's own actions in managing the environment. The purpose of this study was to identify the extent of students awareness of landslides, as they are the future leaders who will lead this world and uphold positive environmental attitudes and practices of the environmentally responsible behaviors. Guided and close-ended questionnaires were distributed to 60 students in four selected schools in Penang Island. From the survey, the results showed awareness of landslide hazard among the students are moderate. This need to be addressed if the awareness of landslide hazard is to be detected at an earlier and beginning stage.

 

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